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The Traviata Project

The Traviata Project

Presented in cooperation with The SusiQ Without Walls

Dates:
May 19 @ 5 p.m.
May 26 @ 5 p.m.
June 2  @ 5 p.m.
  
Participants include:
Dr. Jacob Sustaita, host
Music Director Carl St.Clair
Stage Director Robert Neu
Soprano Cecilia Violetta López

An Online Learning Experience! Symphony Assistant Conductor Dr. Jacob Sustaita hosts three one-hour, online sessions leading up to the much-anticipated June 5th virtual broadcast of Verdi's masterpiece "La Traviata." Get a behind-the-scenes look through exclusive conversations with Music Director Carl St.Clair, Stage Director Robert Neu and members of the cast. Just $35 per household for all three sessions.

Ticket sales for this course are now closed.

Course Description

Session #1:
Verdi’s La Traviata: Love, Pathos, Sacrifice and Illness

Wednesday, May 19 | 5 – 6 p.m.
Exploring the opera’s narrative, characters, theme and meaning. Discussions with Music Director Carl St.Clair and cast members. Insights for new and experienced opera listeners.

Session #2:
Alone Together / Together Alone: Behind the Scenes

Wednesday, May 26 | 5 – 6 p.m.
Verdi’s confronting reflection and commentary of life in his own time, and how Pacific Symphony and partners produced this masterpiece in Covid-times. Discussions with Robert Neu, stage director. Interviews with cast and backstage technical staff. Exclusive video from rehearsals and taping.

Session #3:
Behind the Score: From Failure to Celebrated Icon

Wednesday, June 2 | 5 – 6 p.m.
Verdi’s synthesis of style, drama, virtuosity and humanity. Conversation with Carl St.Clair, Soprano Cecilia Violetta López and Stage Director Robert Neu.

How to Watch

Ticket holders will receive an email with a Zoom link 24 hours before each session. A recording of each session will be made available several days later for renewed viewing for up to one month.

Project attendees will receive a promo code to get $5 off tickets to the June 5 broadcast of "La Traviata."

Behind the Scenes

Learn more about the making of this production of "La Traviata" with Music Director Carl St.Clair and Stage Director Robert Neu.

Dr. Jacob Sustaita - Host

Guest Artist

Dr. Jacob Sustaita - Host

Dr. Jacob Sustaita is the newly appointed assistant conductor of Pacific Symphony. Since 2015, he served as director of orchestral studies at Sam Houston State University. At Sam Houston State, he was responsible for conducting the symphony, chamber, ballet and opera orchestras. In 2018 Sustaita was named associate conductor of the Conroe Symphony Orchestra, and in May 2019, he became the orchestra’s fourth music director. He is a frequent guest conductor and clinician across the country, and he recently made his debut conducting the Juilliard Orchestra. 

Music education has always been at the forefront of his conducting interests. He regularly conducts the Linked Up Concerts created by Carnegie Hall, and he continues to develop innovative platforms for youth and family concerts that provide a meaningful and exciting experience for all concertgoers. He is also a regular presenter at conventions and for teacher in-service and development workshops.

Robert Neu - Stage Director

Guest Artist

Robert Neu - Stage Director

Robert Neu, known for his highly theatrical and musically sensitive work, has directed over one hundred productions of operas, musicals and plays throughout the country. Neu’s recent productions include "The Magic Flute" and "L’Enfant et les sortileges" for Pacific Symphony, among many others.

Cecilia Violetta López - Violetta

Guest Artist

Cecilia Violetta López - Violetta

“Lopez is as compelling a Violetta as I’ve seen. As the consumptive courtesan who, for the purest of reasons, is compelled to relinquish her true love, only ultimately to die in his arms, Lopez managed to infuse every gesture, even in her most consumptive paroxysms, with suggestive sexuality. Her voice, big and rich over its entire range, is remarkably agile for its size and as focused when she sings quietly as it is when she just lets it go. Her “Sempre Libera” was as convincingly radiant and joyful as her “Addio del Passato” was sad and wistful.”  —Joan Reinthaler, The Washington Post